Before we discuss the definition of domestic violence, we should first talk about which relationships are considered “intimate.” The state of Colorado holds an extremely broad view on this subject. It does not require intimate partners to live together or be married in order to bring domestic violence charges against the other. Involved parties may be spouses, former spouses, children, roommates, girlfriends or boyfriends, among others.

The act of domestic violence does not always include physical violence. Of course, hitting, pushing, punching or any act that involves physical harm are all considered so. Other forms may include emotional and psychological abuse such as manipulation tactics or intentionally meaning to breakdown another person mentally. This is commonly known as gaslighting. Verbal abuse is the act of yelling, calling names, intentional intimidation, or harassing communications such as relentless texting. Sexual abuse involves one party being forced or coerced into performing any unwanted sex act. Domestic violence can also include a person using property, such as a beloved pet, to control, punish, or exact revenge against the other.

Law enforcement officers in the state of Colorado operate under a mandatory arrest policy regarding domestic violence. Whether a suspected victim wishes to press charges or not, a suspected abuser must be arrested if officers determine there is probable cause that a domestic violence crime occurred. Because of this, the best advice for any person arrested on any type of domestic violence is to invoke the right to remain silent.

It is not advisable to speak or agree to any plea deal without legal counsel in a Colorado domestic violence situation. An experienced attorney can help you fight false charges, or negotiate the best plea deal possible when charges hold. Do not hesitate to reach out for guidance to obtain the best possible outcome when facing these types of charges.