For more than 35 years, the Colorado attorneys at the The Law Offices of Rodger C. Daley and Associates have helped families navigate complex matters such as divorce and criminal defense. Our lawyers invest time, energy and resources in order to secure favorable outcomes for our clients. To schedule an appointment, call our office in Denver at 720-773-5708 or fill out the form below.

The Law Offices of Rodger C. Daley and Associates
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Denver, CO 80203
Phone: 720-773-5708
Fax: 303-539-0706
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Unmarried parents still need to work out custody details

When people think of child custody, they might automatically think about married parents who are going through a divorce. While that is one situation in these cases, another is that two parents who weren’t married split up. This still requires that they have a custody plan for the kids in place.

We know that there are some unique challenges that come with this situation. One of these is that you can call it quits without having to worry about going through a divorce. This might make it a little easier, but you will still have some work to do.

The child custody agreement has to put the children’s needs first. Both parents need to work toward the goal of having a stable situation for the children that enables them to thrive despite the split. We can help you to evaluate options for the parenting plan that might work for your situation.

There are times when creative custody solutions are in order. These solutions let you take the specific circumstances of your case into account so that you can do what is best for your children. It is imperative that you still have a child custody agreement put in writing so that you can review it when issues creep up during the child’s life.

You might find that things change over the years and that eventually the original plan won’t work. These cases can be resolved through a modification of the order so that the child’s needs are met. Knowing that things can be modified in the future might make it easier for you to think about what the child needs now, since you don’t have to try to figure out how to make current and future needs work together.

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