Last week we discussed the growing use of social in divorce proceedings and how what you post online can come back to haunt you in the event of a divorce. We talked about the importance of discretion when even an innocuous Facebook post can be used as ammunition by your spouse during the divorce.

It is also wise to try to separate your social circle from your spouse’s. If you can’t bear to hit the “unfriend” button on a mutual friend, consider changing your settings so they won’t see anything you don’t want getting back to your spouse.

If your divorce is unusually contentious or if there is a risk of domestic violence, make sure your social media pages do not include information about your location. This protects your privacy and your safety – plus, who wants their ex to know where they are at all times? If all else fails, you may wish to close or temporarily deactivate your account during the divorce. You can always start fresh online when the agreement is signed.

During a divorce, there is more at issue than just who said what on the Internet. In the event of litigation, a court may also require you to keep your emails, which can be used as evidence. So be careful about what you write; an email to a new lover or a message about major assets can affect the outcome of any proceedings.

If you are going through a divorce or just considering one, it is important to enlist the help of someone who is familiar with the process and your rights as you work your way through it. Consider getting in touch with an experienced family law attorney who can review your unique situation, understand the stakes and help you pursue the best possible outcome while protecting your interests.

Source: Law and Daily Life, “5 Rules for Social Media Use During Divorce,” Andrew Lu, Feb. 20, 2013